Realty Executives Local Hummingbird Inc. Brokerage

Serving Powassan & Area

Realty Executives Local Hummingbird Inc. Brokerage

Discover Northern Ontario

Powassan

Photo by: jamie Toeppner

Powassan, Ontario

Overview

Located only 20 minutes south of North Bay, this small town provides all necessary amenities including groceries, restaurants, pharmacies, hardware store, building supply stores, LCBO, Beer, riding stables, feed stores, post office, bank, midwifery, sporting goods, licensing bureau, marketing organizations, accounting services, hair salons and of course, Realty Executives Local Hummingbird Inc, all in the core of the Town.

History

Powassan, an Ojibwa word for "Bend in the River" began as a settlement on the South River about 1880, near the current location of Bingham Chute on Highway 534. With the building of the Northern & Pacific Railway people gravitated to this modern method of transportation and the settlement thrived about 2 miles east of its origin.

This quaint municipality on the Highway 11 corridor offers an extensive list of amenities including various service clubs, churches, schools, medical services, pharmacies, riding stables., etc.

 

Chisholm

Photo By: Jamie Toeppner

Chisholm, Ontario

Overview

Chisholm is located 2 miles east of Powassan and Hwy 11. 

History

Once a thriving community with churches, schools, stores and a Post Office of its own, the arrival of the automobile and improvements to our roads, Chisholm settled into a lovely farming community for several years.

Recently there have been several new commercial endeavours and Chisholm is now home to Eastwood, Chisholm Country Market and Feed Store, Pioneer Nook Furniture, Jay’s Furniture and much more.

Chisholm is also home to a growing Amish community and their horse and buggys are a common sight.

 

Trout Creek

Photo By: Jamie Toeppner

Trout Creek, Ontario

Overview

Trout Creek is a community and unincorporated area in the municipality of Powassan, Parry Sound District in Northern Ontario, Canada.

History

Trout Creek developed as a community when the railroad went through in the mid-1880s. As per usual, the railway established stations, water towers and related buildings whenever the rail lines crossed a body of water, and Trout Creek was no different. Several families, including the Weilers and the Hummels and many others whose names remain today, began to centre on this small community. The early economy developed around lumbering, and expanded to wagon hubs and shingles, and a chemical plant that made charcoal and other distillates. 

Although current day Trout Creek is bypassed by Highway 11, it remains vibrant in spirit and activity and their sense of community.

 

Nipissing

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Nipissing, Ontario

Overview

The Township of Nipissing is located south of North Bay on Highway 11. Most of the Township is zoned as a recreational and rural area and hosts cottage and residential housing.

History

The founder of Nipissing, James Chapman arrived by canoe from Pembroke in 1862. He was granted free land by the Ontario Government and around 1869 James and his wife, Phoebe Edwards, built their first house and barn at the top of the chutes. The family farmed and he carried the mail by canoe, dog team and later horse on a route stretching 200 miles (320 km) between the villages of Magnetawan and Mattawa.

Around 1875 a colonization road was completed which connected tiny Nipissing Village to Rosseau (near Huntsville) in the south and this created road travel and another route for shipment of supplies. Furthermore, in 1886 a railway connected Gravenhurst to Callander, cutting out Nipissing Village from its main route and the life of the village as a key port began to fade. Today the landing is the municipal boat launch, public dock and favourite swimming hole for village children.

 

Callander

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Callander, Ontario

Overview

Callander is a thriving community on Callander Bay, on the south-eastern shore of Lake Nipissing less than 10 minutes south of North Bay.

Callander offers the unique qualities and benefits of small town and country living with the amenities of a larger community close by.

History

The first people in Callander were the Ojibwa and Algonquin descent who have lived around Lake Nipissing for about 9,400 years.

In 1610, one of Samuel de Champlain's apprentices, Etienne Brule, was sent to live with the Huron natives at Georgian Bay. While on route, he discovered Lake Nipissing via the Lvase River Portage (approximately 3 km north of Callander) and established a major fur trading route linking the Ottawa River with the upper Great Lakes.

In 1880, George Morrison, a bookkeeper from Oxford County in Southern Ontario travelled by Ox-cart from Muskoka to Lake Nipissing. There he built a raft and floated his family and possessions across the lake to the south-east bay. Logging companies had taken interest in the abundant Eastern White Pine that grew in the area. He was one of its first pioneers and his wife was the first white woman. On June 1, 1881, he opened a Post Office in his general store and named it after his parents' Scottishbirthplace of Callander.

In addition to the regular lake activities, the recent re-introduction of the Trumpeter Swans to Callander Bay has added a new thrill for bird watching enthusiasts. When winter holds the lake in its icy grip it becomes a playground for ice fishing, cross country skiing, snowmobiling and skating. Spring and fall, whatever the reason or season, visitors will find excellent accommodations at any of our lakeside resorts and campgrounds.

Spectacular sunsets are free!

 

North Bay

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North Bay, Ontario

Overview

Situated on the shores of beautiful Lake Nipissing, North Bay is a vibrant center that offers an abundance of opportunities. From Commerce to culture, education and sports activities, North Bay has attractions for even the most discerning palate.

Home to Nipissing University and Canadore College, the city now welcomes many international students.

This city has long been the home of many artists and musicians, and has now caught the attention of several international film producers. There have been a number of feature films produced locally in the city and in the beautiful surrounding area.

North Bay has produced more that the average number of world class athletes including Kate Pace, a World Downhill Ski Champion, and more hockey players than there is space to list!

History

The site of North Bay was on the main canoe route west from Montreal. Apart from First Nations tribes, voyageurs and surveyors, there was little activity in the Lake Nipissing area until the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in 1882 west from Montreal. Apart from First Nations tribes, voyageurs and surveyors, there was little activity in the Lake Nipissing area until the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in 1882.

North Bay grew through a strong lumbering sector, mining and the three railways in the early days. The town benefited from strong community leadership and people like Richardson, Milne, McNamara, Englands, Browning, McDougal, Carruthers, McGaughey, George W. Lee, Senator Gordon, T. J. Patton, Charlie Harrison, and many others are responsible for its development. In 1919, John Ferguson was elected mayor of North Bay and continued to serve as mayor until 1922. North Bay was incorporated as a city in August 1925.

The Dionne Quintuplets were born in Corbeil, Ontario, on the southern outskirts of North Bay in 1934. Their births had a tremendous impact on tourism in the area. In fact, the Dionnes may have saved the economy in the district during the Depression and beyond. North Bay and area lived off this legacy well into the 1960s. Many visitors to the area discovered lakes and summer retreats that were easily accessible and the businesses thrived on the tourist dollars.

In 1951, as a result of rising tensions in the Cold War, the Royal Canadian Air Force established an air base at North Bay, part of an expanding national air defence network to counter the threat of nuclear attack against North America by Soviet bombers.

The United States Airforce also maintains a unit varying from 34 to 38 personnel at the base, called 1 Air Force. Detachment 2.

 

Corbeil

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Corbeil, Ontario

Overview

Corbeil is a small town located in the District of Nipissing in the province of Ontario in Canada . It has a significant Francophone minority. 

History

Corbeil’s primary claim to fame is being the actual birthplace of the Dionne quintuplets who were born to a poor farming family here. A large complex that was built to house the babies was eventually converted to Nipissing Manor Nursing Home which eventually became the home of Marie-Louise Meilleur, a super-centenarian who was 117 years old when she died in 1998. She was the oldest living person in the world for the eight months preceding her death, and remains both the oldest verified person in Canadian history and the fourth oldest verified person in the world.

 

Astorville

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Astorville, Ontario

 

Overview

Astorville is located in East Ferris township in northeastern Ontario, Canada located between Trout Lake and Lake Nosbonsing in the District of Nipissing.

 

History

In 1885 the village of Astorville was founded by Joseph Alphonse Levesque and named "Tete du Lac," or "Head of the Lake." The name changed to Levesqueville in 1901 and to Nosbonsing in 1904.

Then in 1905, the village was yet again renamed Astorville after Father Antonin Astor, the first missionary in the area.

Following the withdrawal of the J.R. Booth Lumber company from the area, Father Astor was instrumental in encouraging the community to market their agricultural products in the nearby city of North Bay.

Astorville supports a store, church, and a variety of tourist based businesses.

 

Bonfield

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Bonfield, Ontario

Overview

Bonfield is a township comprised of the communities of Blanchard's Landing, Bonfield, Grand Desert, and Rutherglen.

History

Just like many of the other small communities in this area, Bonfield began as a railway stop. Situated on the north shore of Lake Nosbonsing, where the railway crosses the Kaibuskong River, this place was originally named by the CPR as Callander Station as this would be the closest point the CPR would come to the village of Callander.

After the Northern and Pacific Junction Railway established a station in the original village of Callander in 1886 and was taken over by the Grand Trunk Railway in 1888, there was much confusion between the station in Callander and Callander Station. The CPR location, Callander Station was renamed Bonfield, adopting the name of the township in which it is located.

 

Mattawa

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Mattawa, Ontario

Overview

Mattawa is a town in northeastern Ontario, Canada, at the confluence of the Mattawa and Ottawa Rivers in Nipissing District. Mattawa means "Meeting of the Waters" in Algonquin language.

History

Driving through the Town of Mattawa you will notice many large wooden statues depicting local historical figures. Champlain, Pierre-Esprit Radisson, Medard des Groseilliers, and others that are brought to life. The statue of Big Joe Mufferaw, a regional folk hero can be found at the Mattawa District Museum, and is 17 ft (5.2 m) tall. The statues are placed widely throughout Mattawa, and in two locations outside the Town on nearby Highway 17.
Small shops along Main Street offer unique creations from local artists and craftsmen.
Mattawa provides access to numerous dropping off points for canoeing or boating on the Ottawa River. The river acts as a natural border between the hills of the Province of Quebec and Ontario. The Mattawa River flows through the Canadian Shield, and wildlife can often be seen and heard. The area offers fishing, campling, and hiking. There are numerous motels, campgrounds, and retreat centres in and around Mattawa.
Just west is Samuel de Champlain Provincial Park, on the Mattawa River. The park is also home of the Canadian Ecology Centre, an eco-friendly retreat centre that is facilitated to accommodate business retreats. Algonquin Provincial Park can be accessed from the north side in Kiosk or the east side in Brent.
The town and nearby area contain over 200 kilometres (120 miles) of year-round ATV and snowmobile trails known as the Voyageur Multi Use Trail System. (VMUTS).


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